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(732) 246-1377

Tuesday, 16 July 2019

Foot wounds are described as deep tissue being exposed on the feet when the outer skin is damaged. Wounds are also referred to as ulcers. Some groups of people are more susceptible to having wounds on the feet than others. These people typically have diabetes, neuropathy or vascular disease. If you have one or more of these ailments, be sure to check your feet regularly. People also experience wounds from wearing ill-fitting shoes, staying in bed for long periods of time, or incurring an injury. Indications of the presence of an ulcer include drainage, odors, and inflammation. It is imperative to treat a wound early in order to prevent an infection from potentially forming. If an infection materializes, antibiotics or surgery may be necessary. If you believe you have a wound in the foot or ankle area, be sure to see a podiatrist to obtain the proper treatments.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Livingston Footcare. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in North Brunswick, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Tuesday, 09 July 2019

Research has indicated that most babies are born with flat feet, which will most likely change as they become older. This condition may persist in a limited amount of children, and there may be specific reasons for this. The Achilles tendon may be shortened, and this can result in the muscles and ligaments becoming tightened in the heel area. This can lead to reduced motion in the foot and may cause the arch of the foot to become flat. Children who have flat feet after walking begins may experience pain and discomfort in the place of the foot where the arch would normally be, and it may be difficult to move the foot up and down or side to side. If flat feet are left untreated, it can lead to serious foot conditions that may include arthritis. If you notice your child has flat feet while walking, it is suggested to consult with a podiatrist who can help you to find the correct treatment techniques.

Making sure that your children maintain good foot health is very important as they grow. If you have any questions, contact one of our podiatrists of Livingston Footcare. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Keeping Children's Feet Healthy

Having healthy feet during childhood can help prevent medical problems later in life, namely in the back and legs. As children grow, their feet require different types of care. Here are some things to consider...

Although babies do not walk yet, it is still very important to take care of their feet.

Avoid putting tight shoes or socks on his or her feet.

Allow the baby to stretch and kick his or her feet to feel comfortable.

As a toddler, kids are now on the move and begin to develop differently. At this age, toddlers are getting a feel for walking, so don’t be alarmed if your toddler is unsteady or ‘walks funny’. 

As your child gets older, it is important to teach them how to take care of their feet.

Show them proper hygiene to prevent infections such as fungus.

Be watchful for any pain or injury.

Have all injuries checked by a doctor as soon as possible.

Comfortable, protective shoes should always be worn, especially at play.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in North Brunswick, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Do to Keep Your Child’s Feet Healthy
Sunday, 07 July 2019

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Tuesday, 02 July 2019

If you have pain in the foot or ankle area, some conditions are likely to be expected. Seven specific ailments are very common among patients. The first is plantar fasciitis. Signs of this include soreness in the arch or heel that is severe in the morning, and fades throughout the day. Another infliction is a stress fracture, which consists of tiny cracks in the bones that cause pain and tenderness. Additionally, if you twisted your ankle, and then it swells, you may have a sprained ankle. For pain near the toes, a bump at the base of the big toe could indicate the presence of a bunion. If you are an athlete, you may have “turf toe,” which occurs when the big toe is pulled back too far. For suffering near the heel and calf, Achilles tendonitis could be the source. Finally, a heel spur could be creating extra discomfort. These seven conditions may be the cause of your foot or ankle issue. Please consult with a podiatrist to receive a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

Foot and ankle trauma is common among athletes and the elderly. If you have concerns that you may have experienced trauma to the foot and ankle, consult with one of our podiatrists from Livingston Footcare. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Foot and ankle trauma cover a range of injuries all over the foot; common injuries include:

  • Broken bones
  • Muscle strains
  • Injuries to the tendons and ligaments
  • Stress fractures

Symptoms

Symptoms of foot and ankle injuries vary depending on the injury, but more common ones include:

  • Bruising
  • Inflammation/ Swelling
  • Pain

Diagnosis

To properly diagnose the exact type of injury, podiatrists will conduct a number of different tests. Some of these include sensation and visual tests, X-rays, and MRIs. Medical and family histories will also be taken into account.

Treatment

Once the injury has been diagnosed, the podiatrist can than offer the best treatment options for you. In less severe cases, rest and keeping pressure off the foot may be all that’s necessary. Orthotics, such as a specially made shoes, or immobilization devices, like splints or casts, may be deemed necessary. Finally, if the injury is severe enough, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in North Brunswick, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Foot and Ankle Fractures

Contact Information

North Brunswick Office
602 Livingston Ave
North Brunswick, NJ 08902

Phone: (732) 246-1377
Fax: (732) 246-0858

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